El Camino: Astorga to Rabanal del Camino

Todays Trek: Astorga to Rabanal del Camino

We are all children of God.

I went to evening vespers at a little church in Rabanal del Camino. I met the priest in the tiny gift shop and asked when the doors would open.

He said, “Si ya esta abierta.”

“Oh?” I answered, “I couldn’t open the door.”

I thought about that this morning as we walked. Sometimes you have to walk in the loose rock (which hurts my blisters) rather than hop around and take a chance falling or twisting an ankle. As we got closer to our days destination the path became a sloppy, stone laden dry creek bed under the shimmering shadows of trees swaying in the breeze.

I pushed through and talked myself up to the hostal where Ms. Judy waited at the bar.

During vespers sung in Latin, the priest talked to us as pilgrims. He reminded us that we are all children of God. He described that perhaps we were walking with others from other countries or of other traditions and that at times we might find that our grace isn’t long enough.

Perhaps we find ourselves seeking quiet, and the other wants to talk. Perhaps we don’t like how they see things. Perhaps they like to argue.

He reminded us to be strong and push through. He reminded us to use our Christian strength to spread our grace beyond what we thought it could be stretched.

It might not be comfortable or pleasant. It might hurt our sore spots. But it’s what we are called to do.

Our personal grace is meant to be pushed, challenged, and stretched until we think we can give no more, then stretched a little further.

Sometimes the length of our grace isn’t long enough.

So God gave us a human to helps us understand how to stretch it to cover others. We were given a model of grace so that when we forget we are all children of God, His way can become our way.

It won’t always be easy or painless but it will help us push through. We are all children of God, and sometimes our grace doesn’t seem long enough. But it is.

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Siempre pa’ adelante!

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About Caro

I am a social worker by training and a peace officer by profession having worked with California’s delinquent youth and young adults for 28 years. I firmly believe that our development as humans depends on our environment and that sometimes we get stuck. As such, I write about those things we sometimes ignore or fail to see until we are forced to pay attention.
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